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The Calm Before the Produce Storm!

July 19, 2013

My garden is loving this heat! Finally things are starting to size up. So far I’ve harvested lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, greens, basil, parsley, and chives. Lots more is on the way! Peas are blossoming, the beans and cucumbers are climbing to the top of their trellises, zucchinis flowers are waiting for pollination, and today I noticed a few cherry tomatoes beginning to blush! Oh! And Sylva has been picking strawberries from our little patch! She tells me they’re good–she devours them immediately and won’t let me get near the patch.

The Home Garden, including 3 polycultures: beans, carrots, and sunflowers; peas and carrots; broccoli, onions, and beets.

The Home Garden, including 3 polycultures: beans, carrots, and sunflowers; peas and carrots; broccoli, onions, and beets.

I’m bracing myself for the chaos that characterizes the harvest season in our climate that is hospitable for the growth of food plants only 5 or 6 months out of the year. Given the season’s late start, I feel especially antsy about making the most of what I grow and filling up all of those jars in my cupboard that my family has been emptying for the past year.

I also wanted to share this side-by-side comparison of my tomatoes planted in pots and my tomatoes planted in the straw bales. The pots are winning. Not sure if I just need to fertilize my bales more or what. The nice thing about soil is that you can continuously improve it, eventually reducing the need for inputs like fertilizer. After the bales are spent, you just start over with new bales. I’m anxious to see what I end up with by the end of the season. I’d be really excited if I actually do end up with a pile of luscious compost where my bales used to be.

Tomatoes in Straw Bales

Tomatoes in Straw Bales

Tomatoes in Pots

Tomatoes in Pots

Here's a shot of the more aesthetically-focused portion of my garden. Of course the beautiful blooms also attract a lot of helpful pollinators.

Here’s a shot of the more aesthetically-focused portion of my garden. Of course the beautiful blooms also attract a lot of helpful pollinators.

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One Comment
  1. Rheanna permalink

    I definitely see the reason to plant things together that work together for either nutrients they produce in the soil or to help keep pests away, like sage for broccoli, etc. My plants are growing like weeds, and its really exciting, however, I’m anxious too about preserving and canning my harvest. I want to get the most out of it!

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